Vaccinium

 Ericaceae

The World Botanical Associates Web Page
Prepared by Richard W. Spjut
December 2005; August 2006, June 2014

Vaccinium deliciosum
Marble Mts., CA
Spjut s.n., July 2004

Vaccinium membranaceum
Marble Mts., CA
Spjut s.n., July 2004

 

Vaccinium ovalifolium

Idaho: North-central, Clearwater Natl. For., Eldorado Creek near jct. with Dollar Creek, 4617.964, 11538.776, elev. 3,540 ft, wetland prairie with dominant Veratrum californicum surrounded by  forest of Englemann spruce, grand fir, western red cedar, lodgepole pine, western larch. 26 July 2011

Vaccinium ovalifolium
Kenai Peninsula, AK
Spjut & Marin 15464, July 2004

 

Vaccinium ovatum
near Coos Bay, OR
June 1977

 

Vaccinium ovatum
near Trinidad, CA
July 2006

 

Vaccinium uliginosum
Marble Mts., CA
Spjut s.n., July 2004

Vaccinium uliginosum
Oregon coast near Coos Bay, June 1977

Vaccinium vitid-idaea
Kenai Peninsula, AK
Spjut & Marin 15444, July 2004

 

USDA records of procurement for cancer research

Vaccinium arboreum

Vaccinium deliciosum

Vaccium nivictum

Vaccinium parviflorum

Vaccinium scoparium

Vaccinium stamineum

 

Lala G., M. Malik, C. Zhao, J. He, Y. Kwon, M. M. Giusti and B. A. Magnuson. 2006.  Anthocyanin-rich extracts inhibit multiple biomarkers of colon cancer in rats.  Nutr. Cancer 54(1): 8493. The aim of the present study was to investigate the chemoprotective activity of anthocyanin-rich extracts (AREs) from bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), chokeberry (Aronia meloncarpa E.), and grape (Vitis vinifera) by assessing multiple biomarkers of colon cancer in male rats treated with a colon carcinogen, azoxymethane. Fischer 344 male rats were fed the AIN-93 diet (control) or AIN-93 diet supplemented with AREs for 14 wk. Biomarkers that were evaluated included the number and multiplicity of colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF), colonic cell proliferation, urinary levels of oxidative DNA damage, and expression of cyclooxygenase (COX) genes. To assess the bioavailability, levels of anthocyanins in serum, urine, and feces were evaluated. Total ACF were reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry, chokeberry, and grape diet groups compared with the control group. The number of large ACF was also reduced (P<0.05) in bilberry and chokeberry ARE-fed rats. Colonic cellular proliferation was decreased in rats fed bilberry ARE and chokeberry ARE diets. Rats fed bilberry and grape ARE diets had lower COX-2 mRNA expression of gene. High levels of fecal anthocyanins and increased fecal mass and fecal moisture occurred in ARE-fed rats. There was also a significant reduction (P<0.05) in fecal bile acids in ARE-fed rats. The levels of urinary 8-hydroxyguanosine were similar among rats fed different diets. These results support our previous in vitro studies suggesting a protective role of AREs in colon carcinogenesis and indicate multiple mechanisms of action.

Skupien K., J. Oszmianski, D. Kostrzewa-Nowak and J. Tarasiuk. 2005. In vitro antileukaemic activity of extracts from berry plant leaves against sensitive and multidrug resistant HL60 cells.  Cancer Lett. 236(2): 282291.  The aim of the present study was to determine in vitro antileukaemic activity of extracts obtained from selected berry plant leaves (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. cv 'Elsanta', raspberry Rubus ideus L. cv 'Polana' and blueberry Vaccinium corymbosum L. cv 'Bluecrop') against promyelocytic HL60 cell line and its multidrug resistant sublines exhibiting two different MDR phenotypes: HL60/VINC (overexpressing P-glycoprotein) and HL60/DOX (overexpressing MRP1 protein). It was found that the blueberry extract was the most efficient against sensitive HL60 cell line (about 2-fold more active than strawberry and raspberry extracts) but presented much lower activity towards resistant cells. In contrast, strawberry and raspberry extracts exhibited the high cytotoxic activity against sensitive leukaemia HL60 cell line as well as its MDR sublines. The values of resistance factor (RF) found for these extracts were very low lying in the range 0.32/2.0.