Niebla palmeri

The World Botanical Associates Web Page
Prepared by Richard W. Spjut
January 2004, Oct. 2005, Sep 2012
Additions May 2017

Niebla and Vermilacinia (Ramalinaceae) from California and Baja California.  
Spjut, R.W., 1996. ISSN 0833-1475, 208 pp.  
Sida, Botanical Miscellany 14. Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Inc.

Evolutionary history of coastal species of fog lichen genera
Niebla
, Ramalina and Vermilacinia
Emmanuel Sérusiaux & Richard  Spjut
Baja California, Jan-Feb 2016

Evolution and diversification of Niebla
Steve Leavitt et al., Baja California, Dec 2016

 

Niebla sp. aff. palmeri
Bahía
de San Quintín,
Laguna and peninsula, on beach sand, 30 m

Spjut & Sérusiaux 17061
Jan 2016

Niebla sp. aff. palmeri
Bahía
de San Quintín,
Laguna and peninsula

Spjut & Sérusiaux 17062C
Jan 2016

 

 

Niebla sp. aff. palmeri
Bahía
de San Quintín,
Laguna and peninsula

Spjut & Sérusiaux 17051
Jan 2016

 

 

Niebla sp. aff. palmeri
South of El Rosario along road to Punta Baja, on sandy, wind-swept ridgeline, 80 m
Leavitt et al. 16-1022,
Dec 2016

 

Niebla palmeri
Rocky mesa E of San Antonio del Mar, Spjut & Sérusiaux 17021, Jan 2016

  

Niebla sp. aff. palmeri
South of El Rosario along road to Punta Baja, on sandy, wind-swept ridgeline, 80 m.
Leavitt et al. 16-1004
, Dec 2016

 

Lava mesa above San Antonio del Mar, 52 m, Spjut & Sérusiaux 17020, Jan 2016.

Isla de los Coronados, Palmer 310, holotype (US)

Ridge southwest of El Rosario, Spjut 10280B, Mar 1988

 

     Niebla palmeri is a lichen that is endemic to Baja California (Mexico), occurring infrequently in the chaparral region and on Coronado Island. It is recognized by its terricolous habit—in which it is not attached to the substrate by a common attachment point or holdfast—and by the lichen substance sekikaic acid (with triterpenes), or with additional depside as seen in TLC plates using solvent B (N. aff. palmeri). The thallus is much divided into stiff ribbon like branches that are often dilated terminally and irregularly fringed, torn and twisted; the flabellate form appears to have both divaricatic and sekikaic acids.  The species appears most similar to N. pulchribarbara and N. effusa, which differ in having protocetraric acid and salazinic acid, respectively.